Blue Gull Inn

Category Archives: Places to See

Arts & Entertainment in Port Townsend

February 28, 2019 by bluegullinn

Arts & Entertainment

Port Townsend,

Port Townsend, Arts & Entertainment

National Geographic calls Port Townsend “one of the most sophisticated places west of Seattle,” and arts and entertainment is a large part of the reason why.

For more than three decades, artists of all ages have flocked to Centrum, the nonprofit arts organization located at Fort Worden State Park, for artist residencies, workshops and performances. Centrum’s summer performance festivals in music and literature are national events, drawing thousands to the area.

Copper Canyon Press, also located at Fort Worden, is the nation’s premier poetry publishing house. Copper Canyon Press fosters the work of emerging, established, and world-renowned poets for an expanding audience.

Jazz at Centrum

Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend is a summer highlight

Located at the entrance to downtown, Northwinds Arts Center is a hub of visual arts and literary activity, producing educational programs, lectures, readings and workshops, and by providing juried and invitational venues for displaying the work of regional artists.

Key City Public Theatre is perhaps the most active and vital theater organization on the Olympic Peninsula. Their year-round slate of performances and workshops draws audiences from around the region.

Port Townsend’s location, coupled with its proximity to the Seattle/Vancouver/Portland metro areas, makes the town an attractive destination for national music acts and audiences looking for intimate performance experiences.

From music, to theater, to visual and performing arts, Port Townsend is a destination not to be missed. Be sure to visit PTGuide.com’s comprehensive arts and entertainment calendar to find out what’s happening in Port Townsend.

Enjoy Fort Worden State Park

February 27, 2019 by bluegullinn

A Newsletter from Washington State Parks | February 2019

View as a webpage

Reservations  |  Discover Pass  |  Passes & Permits  |  Boating  |  Support Your Parks

Discover Pass gives you year-round access to millions of acres

When you purchase your Discover Pass, you aren’t just buying a parking pass. You are directly supporting the preservation of public lands. Not only does the Discover Pass give you access to state parks, it also offers you access to millions of acres of state recreation lands in Washington, including:

Purchase your Discover Pass today!

 

Welcome spring with Holi

at Lake Sammamish State Park

The Washington State Parks Folk & Traditional Arts Program invites the public to celebrate spring at the 2019 Holi Celebration at Lake Sammamish State Park in Issaquah.

 

The annual celebration runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 23. (Driving directions.) The free event, which takes place at the park’s kitchen shelter, will include a Bollywood DJ, traditional music & dance and family-friendly activities. Nontoxic paint powder and vegetarian Indian food will be available for purchase.

 

Holi, an ancient Hindu spring festival, is also known as the Festival of Colors. This joyful and vibrant holiday brings participants of all ages and walks of life together to celebrate, socialize and say goodbye to winter. Learn more about Holi at the event!

 

The Holi Celebration is part of a broader series of events that celebrate Washington’s diverse heritage presented by the Folk & Traditional Arts Program. Learn more.

 

Discover Pass is required for vehicle parking.

 

 

Beat the winter chill

with a State Parks scarf

Feeling chilly with the cold weather and snow Washington has been receiving this year? Then get your hands on the new Washington State Parks scarf!

 

This beautiful, high-quality woven scarf is two sided and lets you proudly support Washington State Parks Winter Recreation Program.

 

The scarf is 61 inches long by 6.5 inches tall. It sells for $20 (includes tax) at Washington State Parks headquarters building, 1111 Israel Road SW, Tumwater, 98501. Or $20 plus $7 to have it shipped to you. Call (360) 902-8844.

 

The scarf is 80 percent acrylic and 20 percent polyester, and is machine washer/dryer safe.  Proceeds support the Winter Recreation Program. Limited supply, so get your scarf today!

 

Find out how you can get your very own scarf here.

 

Photo: Blake the snowshoe hare is one of the mascots for State Parks’ Winter Recreation Program.

 

 

Avoid the rush!

Book a cabin or campsite now!

Planning your spring or summer vacation? State parks’ accommodations fill up fast, but you can make reservations up to nine months in advance for most parks.

 

If you waited too long to snag those summer weekend dates last year, consider a mid-week reservation. You might have better luck if you can be flexible on your dates. And there’s always the off season. Many cabins and yurts are cheaper then, too!

 

Looking for suggestions? We currently have openings for cabins and yurts at Twin Harbors and Ike Kinswa state parks. Book your stay today!

 

Photo: Yurt at Twin Harbors state park

Coast Artillery Museum – Port Townsend

June 13, 2016 by bluegullinn

Coast Artillery Museum – Port Townsend

The Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum at Fort Worden.

Museum Building

Home  |   Upcoming Events  |   Photos  |   Volunteer Work Parties  |   About Us  |   Contact Us  

 

On January 1, 2016 CAM will once again be participating in the State Parks First Day Hike Program. Coast Artillery Museum – Port Townsend. We’ll be starting near Battery Randol/Memory’s Vault at the top of Artillery Hill. This year we’ll be doing it a little differently. We’ll give a brief historical talk, then provide people with a pamphlet that provides a self-guided walking tour. That way people can take as long as they want, and cover as much of the area as they’d like. We’ll also provide at least one guided tour at 1 PM, plus additional talks and self-guided tour information as people show up until 3PM. Bring a flashlight if possible, cell phone flashlights will do, and people can share a light if necessary.

Coast Artillery Museum – Port Townsend. If we have enough volunteers current plans are to also have the Harbor Entrance Control Post open for tours, and we may start everything there. If so there will be signs directing people to the HECP from Memory’s Vault, it’s about 100 yards away.

The Coast Artillery Museum is open every day.

The museum is located in Building 201 (one of the original 1904 Barracks) next to the Park Office at Fort Worden. It is open 365 days/year 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend we have extended hours on Fridays and Saturdays: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: Effective April 1, 2013 rates are $4 adults, $2 ages 6-12, and a $10 family value package covering 2 generations. Admission is free for children ages 5 and younger and active duty service members. Effective August 15, 2014 partners and dependents of active duty military service members pay half price. Group rates are available for students, scouts and similar organizations by prior arrangement. Please Contact the Museum.

Help support Washington State Parks, purchase a Discover Pass. Passes are available at (click on the names for a Google Map) the Friends of Fort Worden Gift Shop (in their new location), the Coast Artillery Museum at Fort Worden, the Marine Science Center at Fort Worden, the Registration Desk in the Commons, and some other Fort Worden Partners for $30 without any additional charges so you save $5. Because the Partners sell the Pass at cost without any markup, some only take cash or checks. The Coast Artillery Museum, the Gift Shop and the Registration Desk in the Commons can accept credit cards.

Visit Fortworden.org for information about accommodations and events at the Fort.

Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day the Harbor Entrance Control Post will be open for tours on Saturdays from 11 AM to 3 PM, and there is a free, guided Walking Tour of Artillery Hill beginning at 1 PM on Saturdays, starting in the grassy field near Battery Randol. The walking tour covers 1-1.5 miles and can last up to 2 hours if people are interested, but you’re welcome to join up or leave at any time. A flashlight is advised, but not required. Donations are always appreciated, we have a box at the HECP when it’s open, and always at the Museum. Occasional extra days are scheduled, please see our Upcoming Events page for details.

The tours are also available for groups at any time by special arrangement, please call the Museum at (360) 385-0373 to discuss it. For those unable to walk to the top of the hill, you can check in at the Park office and present a Washington State disabled parking pass or equivalent to make arrangements to drive to the top of the hill. You will still need to be able to navigate uneven ground and some stairs to make the tour itself.

 

For information about other events at Fort Worden, and for reservation information please see FortWorden.org.
If you’d like to become a member of the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum you may download this Membership Application.

CAM LogoCAM Logo

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum
Building 201
Fort Worden
200 Battery Way
Port Townsend, WA 98368
(360) 385-0373

Commanding Officer’s Quarters – Port Townsend

June 12, 2016 by bluegullinn

 

Open 12 noon to 5 p.m. daily, May through September. Open weekends in March and April.

coq
Map of Fort Worden (click)

Commanding Officers Quarters

coq

 

ADMISSION
$6.00 for Adults
$5.00 for Seniors
$1.00 for Children

Seasonally, a passport is available to see the COQ museum, Rothschild House museum and the Jefferson Museum of Art & History for a reduced rate: $6.00 for 2 sites; $12.00 for 3 sites.
Visiting all three provides visitors with a wealth of information about Port Townsend, both historically and geographically.  

Commanding Officer’s Quarters – Port Townsend. The Commanding Officer’s Quarters is located at Fort Worden State Park & Conference Center, 200 Battery Way, Port Townsend. The house is one of Fort Worden’s finest buildings. It was completed in April 1904, and many different families resided there. Located at the head of Officers’ Row, the Commanding Officer’s Quarters overlooks Admiralty Inlet, with Mt. Baker and the Cascades in the background. Late Victorian and Edwardian furnishings provide a unique glimpse into the life of a senior U. S. Army officer and his family in the first decade of the 20th century.

Fort Worden State Park

Fort Worden is an early 20thfortcentury U. S. Army (Coast Artillery Corps) fort. The Fort, as headquarters for the Puget Sound Harbor Defenses, held a strategically important position in the triangle of defensive forts constructed to protect the entrance to Puget Sound and to safeguard the naval shipyard at Bremerton. Twelve-gun batteries stand as mute testimony to the Fort’s original purpose.

When Fort Worden was commissioned in 1902, there were no permanent buildings to house the troops. The men were billeted in tents atop Artillery Hill until the first 23 buildings were constructed around the parade ground in 1904. Ultimately, 228 main buildings and subsidiary structures were constructed—including barracks, officers’ quarters, administration buildings, kitchen and mess halls, a bakery, guard house, hospital, power house, signal station and wharf.

Most military buildings of this era are long gone, but Fort Worden’s have been preserved. These surviving quarters are excellent examples of the attractive order, style and grace of the new century. The designs were created by the U. S. Army Quartermaster Department in order to make life more bearable for its soldiers in the often-isolated posts.

Port Townsend Aero Museum

June 11, 2016 by bluegullinn

Port Townsend Aero Museum

Video Screenshot

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Port Townsend Aero Museum. The Port Townsend Aero Museum preserves aviation history in the Pacific Northwest. Located 45 miles northwest of Seattle, flanked by the Olympic Mountains and the Puget Sound, the museum contributes to a vibrant community. Our youth mentorship program is second to none. Young adults participate in all aspects of operations, including restoration and flight activities. Our collection includes a variety of antique and classic aircraft. We regularly fly those aircraft that are safe and airworthy. Restorations are performed in-house by an expert group of mechanics and volunteers. Our shop also performs contract restoration work. The museum is publicly owned and receives no tax-based funding. If you like our program, please consider contributing.

Thank you for visiting!

Our Story

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The Port Townsend Aero Museum began operations in 2001, founded by experienced aircraft restorers Jerry and Peggy Thoutte. With an initial donation of six flying antique aircraft and several restoration projects, the museum quickly attracted a group of dedicated young volunteers. The youth mentorship program grew alongside the collection.
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Ground breaking ceremony for new PTAM building, Summer 2005

PTAM under construction

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The museum was originally based out of a scattering of hangars at the west end of the airport. Fundraising for a new building was a major undertaking, with proceeds coming from contract work, rummage sales, online auctions and individual donations. After seven years of hard work by museum volunteers and contributers, along with generous support from the community and local contractors, we were proud to open our new $3.5 million facility to the public in the summer of 2008. Work has now begun on a restoration shop near the new buildling. Plans are in place for continued expansion over the next several years.
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Several hundred young adults have participated in the mentorship program over the years. Our aircraft collection continues to grow. We fly our airplanes regularly, visiting select events during the airshow season. We are a dynamic organization serving our community and the greater Puget Sound region. We invite you to stop by and see for yourself!
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Youth volunteers working on wing

PTAM Logo

ROTHSCHILD HOUSE – Port Townsend

May 8, 2016 by bluegullinn

ROTHSCHILD HOUSE
Historic House Museum

Managed by the Jefferson County Historical Society for Washington State Parks

  Herb Garden Rothschild House Guest Bedroom

OPEN MAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER

The Rothschild House is located on the bluff at the corner of Franklin and Taylor Streets.  Admission is $4 for adults and $1 for children 3-12.  Group rates are available by prior arrangement by calling 360-385-1003.  Admission is free for JCHS members and on the first Saturday of each month for Jefferson County residents.

ADMISSION
$4 for adults
$1 for children 3-12
Half price for tour group members
Passport Available for Rothschild House and one or
two additional museums

Admission is free for members of the
Jefferson County Historical Society. 

We invite you to become a member.

The Rothschild House Museum opened for the season May 1 with a new exhibit of dresses featuring fancy handwork. JCHS exhibit designer, Becky Schurmann said, “We create a new textile exhibit in the house every year. This year we decided to feature some of the amazing handwork on textiles from our collection. The dresses date from about 1890 to the 1930s. They all feature fancy handwork including beads, sequins, fabric roses and embroidery.

Suzanne Hempstead and Gay Stover admire one of the dresses on display at the Rothschild House Museum.

MAP  to Rothschild House

Rothschild House History
Volunteer Opportunities

Jefferson County Historical Society
Copyright 1997 – 2012, JCHS Board of Trustees
All rights reserved.

The Blue Gull Inn B&B is one of the first homes built in Port Townsend, WA. Our home was built by ND Hill in 1868. If you can imagine, our home was built 3 years after the end of the Civil War. ND Hill had a large family and needed a large home with a large dining room. Perfect for a Bed & Breakfast. Join us for a great Breakfast!!! ND Hill was our local pharmacist, back then a pharmacy is a combination today of a pharmacy and hardware store.

Point Wilson Lighthouse – Port Townsend

April 11, 2016 by bluegullinn

 

Description: Point Wilson Lighthouse – Port Townsend. It was early in the morning on April 1, 1921 when Keeper William J. Thomas of Point Wilson Lighthouse heard a sickening grinding noise. He knew instantly there was trouble in the water and quickly telephoned Port Townsend to send help.Point Wilson Lighthouse – Port Townsend. What Keeper Thomas heard was the slamming of the crowded passenger liner Governor of the Admiral Line into the freighter West Hartland. The 417-footGovernor had just offloaded passengers in Victoria and was bound for Seattle, when it rounded Port Townsend and was rammed by the freighter. Reports of the accident would later conclude that the pilot on the Governor mistook the West Hartland’s running lights for the fixed lights on Marrowstone Point and failed to yield the right-of-way. A ten-foot gash was torn in the Governor’s iron hull, and even though the captain of the West Hartland ordered full speed ahead to try to keep the hole plugged, the Governor soon began to sink in 240 feet of water. In the time it took for the vessel to sink, most of the passengers were able to scamper aboard the West Hartland, and all but eight of the 240 people aboard the Governor were rescued.

Original Point Wilson Lighthouse

Keeper Thomas, who was in the lighthouse at the time of the collision, provided the following account of the accident:

It was just 12:05 this morning when I heard the crash. As I turned in the direction of the sound, I saw the West Hartland with her nose rammed into the Governor’s starboard side amidships. It was clear and the vesssels were plainly in sight about three quarters of a mile away.I immediately called Port Townsend and tried to get the coast guard cutters, Arcataand Snohomish. Both were out of port. I finally got several launches out. I could see the boats putting out, and it wasn’t more than an hour before the Governor sank.

Point Wilson Lighthouse – Port Townsend. Point Wilson, named by Captain George Vancouver in 1792 after his colleague Captain George Wilson, marks the western side of the entrance to Admiralty Inlet from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and is an important landmark for vessels traveling to and from Puget Sound. This critical turn was first marked by a church bell. Recognizing that the point was often shrouded by fog, in 1865, Captain J.W. Sheldon donated a ship’s bell to St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Port Townsend with the condition that the bell be rung on foggy days. Several years later, a steamer used the sound of the bell as a guide into Port Townsend harbor. John H. Yates was so touched after reading the newspaper account of the dual-role the bell played, that he wrote the hymn, “The Harbor Bell.”

Point Wilson Lighthouse – Port Townsend. Congress passed an act on June 20, 1878 appropriating $8,000 for establishing a light and fog signal at Point Wilson, but as this amount was insufficient for both aids, priority was placed on the fog signal. The fog signal machinery was built in Portland during the winter of 1878 – 1879, and on March 3, 1879, an additional $12,000 was allocated for the station. The fog signal building was built by hired labor under the direction of the district engineer, and a twelve-inch steam whistle housed therein was placed in operation on September 1, 1879, giving an eight-second blast every minute.

A $923 contract to manufacture the lantern room for the lighthouse was awarded to Smith Brothers & Watson, the lowest bidders, on July 2, 1879, and a lens, formerly used at Point Bonita, California, was sent northward to be installed at the station. Plans for the lighthouse were approved on August 12, and the district engineer supervised its construction over the next four months. C.W. Holt and a crew of eighteen men commenced construction of the lighthouse on September 2, 1879.

Station buildings on Point Wilson in 1916

The lighthouse consisted of a twelve-foot-square frame tower rising to a height of forty-six-foot from the pitched roof of a two-story keeper’s dwelling. The tower first exhibited its fixed white light, which could be seen for up to thirteen miles, on December 15, 1879, and mariners “were unanimous in expressions of commendation of the excellence of the light and of the efficiency of the fog-signal.”David M. Littlefield, a Civil War veteran and local resident, was appointed the first keeper at Point Wilson and was paid an annual salary of $800. Littlefield served as keeper for four years before moving back to Port Townsend, where he would later serve as a City Councilman, Mayor, and Collector of Customs.

In 1894, a galvanized-iron oil house was built on the station grounds, and a new lens was installed in the lantern room, changing the light’s characteristic from fixed white to fixed white varied by a red flash every twenty seconds.

Water to operate the station’s steam whistle was captured from cement water sheds and stored in a brick cistern. One would think that there would always be ample rainfall in Washington, but Port Townsend lies in a rain shadow caused by the Olympic Mountains and sees little rainfall during the summer months. This proved to be an issue on September 29, 1896, when the steamer Umatilla left Victoria, British Columbia just after midnight, bound for Puget Sound in a dense fog. The fog signal at Point Wilson was inoperable due to a lack of water, and the steamship was forced to navigate by sounding its whistle at regular intervals and listening for echoes to judge its proximity to land.

The 310-foot-long Umatilla struck rocks about a mile west of Point Wilson, but Captain J.C. Hunter was able to quickly free his vessel and decided to try to reach Port Townsend. The impact punctured the Umatilla’s hull, and as the crew had failed to close the doors sealing off the ship’s five hull compartments, water quickly flooded in, quenching the engine’s fires. Realizing the danger he was in, Captain Hunter wisely ran the Umatilla aground a few hundred yards from Point Wilson Lighthouse and lowered the bow anchors to hold the ship in place. All passengers were safely offloaded, but the ship and cargo suffered roughly $100,000 in damages. Though Point Wilson’s fog signal wasn’t sounding, Captain Hunter and his pilot were censured for “overconfidence.”

High tides and stormy weather occasionally took their toll on the sandy beach on which the tower was built. In 1886, a picket fence, 5 feet high and 440 feet long, was built across the low part of the spit to catch drifting sound and build up the area where a breach seemed likely. By 1904, much of the beach had eroded, threatening the integrity of the lighthouse. The problem was temporarily fixed by 1,542 tons of stone reinforcement piled on the eastern and northern sides of the reservation.

Lens in Point Wilson Lighthouse

The current lighthouse was completed in 1914, but the original lighthouse, minus its tower, continued to serve as aresidence for the keepers. The new lighthouse features a forty-nine-foot concrete tower, built in an octagonal shape to reduce wind pressure, which projects upward from a fog signal building. The light still shines from the fourth-order Fresnel lens, sending forth alternate red and white flashes every five seconds.In 1917, the Secretary of Commerce urged lighthouse keepers to cultivate as much land as possible at their stations in anticipation of food shortages during World War I. Keeper William Thomas willingly complied and that fall sent the following letter to the lighthouse inspector.

Sir: Have sent you to-day per parcel post a sample of some of the vegetables I raised on the station here. Peas, potatoes, carrots, lettuce, garlic, and squash do well, but tomatoes, cabbage, and turnips are a failure; beans fairly well after planting four times; have 4 gallons of beans salted and 2 gallons canned. The yield was good, but of course of small quantity, as space was limited. Early onions and lettuce were splendid; gave Heather (the lighthouse tender) some for their mess.

Keeper Thomas was commended by the department for the energy and zeal he showed in obtaining such fine results, and a photograph showing a potato, parsnip, carrot, and a bulb of garlic that he grew in the station’s sandy soil is preserved in the National Archives.Like those at Point Bonita and Point Loma, the light at Point Wilson was extinguished during World War II as a defense measure to protect nearby Fort Worden and the entrance to Puget Sound.

Today, a computer, located at the Coast Guard Air Station at Port Angeles, monitors the light, which was automated in 1976. The keepers’ quarters were occupied by Coast Guard personnel until 2000. During the winters of 2005 and 2006, high winds and waves pummeled the low-lying lighthouse property flooding the basement of the keepers’ dwelling and ripping the fog horn from its soundwall. The State of Washington has considered purchasing the property from the Coast Guard and combining it with nearby Fort Worden State Park, however, in 2007 the scheduled review of this proposal was delayed. Moving the lighthouse and associated buildings, which will likely cost between $3 and $5 million dollars, is considered the only long-term solution for saving the station. In the meantime, the Coast Guard is filling in the holes that have developed in the wall of rock armor built around the point.

During the summer of 2011, divers with the Marine Documentation Society visited the wreck of the Governor and discovered the ship’s bell, buried in silt. Because the divers didn’t have an expert with them to authenticate the bell, it was left with the wreckage. The owners of the salvage rights for the wreck are considering what to do with the bell once it is recovered. Placing it on exhibit at the lighthouse wouldn’t be a bad option.

Keepers:

  • Head: David M. Littlefield (1879 – 1883), William H. Jakins (1883 – 1884), George Draper (1884 – 1888), Edmund Bailey (1888 – 1894), Hans P. Score (1894 – 1899), Charles W. Sheldon (1899 – 1900), Thomas J. Stitt (1900 – 1913), William J. Thomas (1914 – 1926), Mortimer Galvin (1926 – 1932), Merrill D. Spencer (1932 – 1935), Carl Lien (1935 – 1943), Rudolph Tolman (1943 – 1950).
  • First Assistant: Nathaniel L. Rogers (1879 – 1880), H.H. Edwards (1880 – 1881), William H. Jakins (1881 – 1883), Joseph E. Evans (1883 – 1885), Edward Scannel (1885 – 1888), Anthony W. Miller (1888 – 1890), George H. Stilwell (1890 – 1891), Joseph Dunson (1891 – 1894), Edward Durgan (1894 – 1895), Albert F. Allen (1895 – 1896), George H. Stilwell (1896 – 1898), Charles J. Smith (1898 – 1903), Andrew Jackson (1903 – 1905), Charles E. Baker (1905 – 1907), Paul A. Chevalier (1907 – 1908), Henry H. Stonefield (1908 – at least 1913), Charles E. Atherton (at least 1915 – at least 1917), Edmund N. Cadwell (at least 1918), Forrest A. Tuttle (at least 1919), Henry J. Williams (at least 1920 – at least 1921), Charles D. Whitehead (1924 – 1925), Merrill D. Spencer (1927 – 1932), Rudolph C. Toman (1935 – 1943), Ted Menzoni ().
  • Second Assistant: Robert M. Langos (1939 – 1942).

Photo Gallery: 1 2 3 4 5 6

References

  1. Annual Report of the Lighthouse Board, various years.
  2. “Still on Point Wilson,” The San Francisco Call, October 1, 1896.
  3. Lighthouses of the Pacific, Jim Gibbs, 1986.
  4. Umbrella Guide to Washington Lighthouses, Sharlene and Ted Nelson, 1998.
  5. Lighthouses of the Pacific Coast, Randy Leffingwell and Pamela Welty, 2000.

Marine Science Center – Port Townsend

April 3, 2016 by bluegullinn

Marine Science Center – Port Townsend

OUR MISSION: INSPIRING CONSERVATION OF THE SALISH SEA

Marine Science Center – Port Townsend. The Port Townsend Marine Science Center (PTMSC) is an educational and scientific organization devoted to understanding and conserving our marine and shoreline environment.

Through its various programs, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center:

  • Teaches respect for and stewardship of the myriad life forms in that environment;
  • Creates active and involving educational experiences for groups, with a particular emphasis on youth;
  • Provides exhibits, programs, and publications featuring local marine and shoreline habitat, history, flora, and fauna;
  • Encourages meaningful volunteer experiences in PTMSC activities;
  • Provides citizen science opportunities for the general public;
  • Partners and cooperates with other organizations dedicated to the conservation of Puget Sound and the NW Straits;
  • Encourages understanding of and participation in local, national, and international decisions impacting the marine and shoreline environment.

OUR HISTORY

The Port Townsend Marine Science Center was founded in 1982 by two teachers and was initially run entirely by volunteers. Over the years the science center has continued to grow in a steady, thoughtful manner, and its volunteers, now numbering more than 100, are still integrally involved in the organization. Throughout its development, PTMSC has remained committed to its mission of inspring conservation of the Salish Sea.

OUR FOUNDERS

 

Judy D’Amore

Judy was a founder of the Port Townsend Marine Science Center back in 1982. Judy has had many roles at PTMSC over the years, including designing and coordinating many of our education programs for students and teachers.

Judy loves the challenge of creating experiences that make scientific information clear, accessible and interesting to everyone.

 

 

Libby Palmer

Libby was a founder of the Port Townsend Marine Science Center in 1982 along with Judy D’Amore. She has served the Center in many ways over the years including researching, designing, and creating the original contents for the Natural History Exhibit, developing and conducting teacher training workshops (Onshore/Offshore), developing and teaching the first day camps, and managing the Orca Project (with Chrissy McLean and Heather Jones).

Northwest Maritime Center

March 29, 2016 by bluegullinn

 Northwest Maritime Center – Port Townsend

Northwest Maritime Center

Northwest Maritime Center

Northwest Maritime Center

Northwest Maritime Center. The mission of Northwest Maritime Center is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery. We’re many things, and at our core we are a campus that uses powerful maritime experiences to educate, inspire people to adventure, and celebrate our maritime culture. We do it for our own love of boats, in service to the local community and maritime industry, but mostly because regardless of the  subject, the sea is the most powerful teacher we know.

Rent Our Facility
Located at the intersection of the historic downtown district and Point Hudson, our LEED Gold-certified facilities include meeting and event spaces that can be configured to accommodate a wide range of groups–from small meetings to large celebrations.

Learn Our History
Founded in 1978, after the first and highly successful Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, the Wooden Boat Foundation has grown over three decades to serve nearly 150,000 people annually in its educational programs, events and services.

Meet the Staff
Contact information for our staff of full- and part-time year-round employees.

Join Our Staff
See what openings we may have available.

Meet Our Sponsors
Learn more about the great businesses and community that support our organization.

Meet the Board
Meet the hardworking men and women who serve on our Board of Directors.

Meet the Pilothouse Association
Meet the generous individuals and organizations who helped get us off the ground.

Read Our Annual Report (PDF)
View our most recent (2014) Annual Report for an overview of our programs and a list of our many supporters.

Enjoy these short videos showing different aspects of our work and how our supporters make amazing things happen here at the Northwest Maritime Center! (Click to view.)

On the Water with You      Full Steam Ahead

Creating Impact    Pulling Together

Sequim Lavender Festival 2016

March 7, 2016 by bluegullinn

Sequim Lavender Weekend July 15, 16 & 17, 2016

Sequim Lavender Festival 2016

Sequim Lavender Festival 2016

Thanks everyone for attending the Sequim Lavender Weekend!
Be sure to SAVE THE DATE for next year July 15, 16, & 17, 2016.

Sequim Lavender Festival 2016. A world class street fair, lavender farms, and a host of community events make the Sequim Lavender Weekend one of the biggest lavender celebrations in the country.

For close to two decades, Sequim and the surrounding Dungeness Valley have been internationally recognized as the premier growers of this fragrant herb. Family owned farms are prized for the special attention they give to growing the finest lavender in the country.  Sequim is bursting with activity during this three day celebration of everything lavender the third weekend in July.

This website is updated as new events and details are finalized.  Check back often for the latest information.

Get the details on all of the 2015 lavender events!  Check back in the spring of 2016 for updated information.
Learn about Farm Tours
Learn about the Sequim Lavender Festival Street Fair
Learn more about Community Events during the weekend

Sequim Lavender Weekend Event Map

The City of Sequim is proud to produce the official event map for Sequim Lavender Weekend providing an overview of all of the events occurring during the weekend for the convenience of our visitors.

All of the farms have different activities and featured events during the weekend.  Please check the official program, the information on this website, and individual farm and community organization websites for more details on their events.

Looking for a place to stay? Enjoy a great breakfast at the Historic Blue Gull Inn B&B located in Port Townsend. Great dining, shopping and beaches await your visit to the Olympic Peninsula. Have fun at the Lavender Festival.

Download the 2015 map. (4.5 mb)
Check back in the spring of 2016 for the updated map.
Sequim Lavender Weekend Event Map

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